Woodland Shade Gardening

Woodland shade gardening with a purpose – pleasure, creativity, rainwater collection!

The North (rainwater) River

Nice curve

Finally I carried through with a project that has been playing around in my mind for many, many months – damming The North (rainwater) River.  There were two existing border walls, put into place this spring because the dirt was washing away from the fronts of the beds on each side of this area where rainwater rushes, after flowing downhill from all areas of the front of the property, and merging near this area to rush with great force on to the lower back of the property.  My attention was brought to this dirt being washed away when I noticed countless jonquil bulbs poking out the sides of the then-unwalled beds, exposed and in peril.  Having a not-flat property is creating some splendid design possibilities, but most of these designs are my effort to control erosion.

Maybe not the shape I would prefer, but it works to connect the two existing walls, and to bluntly slow the velocity of the rainwater river during heavy storms

Maybe not the shape I would prefer, but it works to connect the two existing walls, and will quickly slow the velocity of the rainwater during heavy storms.

Okay, maybe the rocks are only a temporary fix

The path of rainwater flow is evident – from outside the gate, underneath the gate, and into these back gardens – gaining speed and soil-moving strength as it travels. Maybe that gutter downspout needs to be modified so the rainwater from it will travel away from this area, into the usually drier area to the left. I’m not ready for a rain barrel yet. Any other ideas?

Water rushing underneath the gate will pool here, seep more slowly downhill, and rich organic debris will collect behind the dam

The river will pool between the gate and the new paver wall (downhill), cresting over the top of the wall more slowly and, hopefully, more gently.

The 3-inch layer of mulch, applied this spring, has long since washed away

The 3″ layer of mulch, applied this spring, has long-since washed away. The North (rainwater) River is again cutting into the silt clay, which is no longer covered with topsoil.

Rocks on left side of open area will hold back the luscious soil for the azalea & creeping gardenia, and maybe sort of play off the rock surround of the nearby flower bed

Rocks on left side of pooling area will hold back the luscious soil for the azalea and creeping gardenia. With time, the pool area will fill with organic material, and the rocks will be less visible, especially as the azalea and creeping gardenia mature.

Inspection Crew Supervisor

Emily, the Inspection Supervisor, arrives. Emily is the Supervisor Of Everything!

The deeply-cut groove is quite noticeable in this photo.

Katy has joined the Inspection Crew, and all details are being scrutinized.

Katy is wondering why this isn't deeper, and made into a pool where she can swim

Katy wonders why this isn’t deeper, and made into a pool where she can swim.

Stranded centiped, waiting for water to recede

During the last downpour of rain, this centipede sat here a long time, waiting for the floodwaters to recede.

The sight of rushing rainwater, cutting more and more deeply into the earth, is distressing to the gardener.  I am already planning another rainwater retaining wall ‘downstream’.  Stay tuned!

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One comment on “The North (rainwater) River

  1. Clara
    September 10, 2015

    The gutter downspout? What about attaching one of those accordion drain hoses, the one with holes, maybe connecting two somehow once you get it underground, to take the rainwater from the gutter to the roots of the planting bed to the left. The dry area?
    I like the pic of the centipede. That’s so cute.

    Like

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This entry was posted on September 8, 2015 by in My Woodland Garden.
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Woodland shade gardening with a purpose - pleasure, creativity, rainwater collection!

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