Woodland Shade Gardening

Woodland shade gardening with a purpose – pleasure, creativity, rainwater collection!

North Carolina CORN!

Carl was very interested in growing a small field of corn in the spring of 2008.  He had experience growing corn, one year, in our previous 1/5 acre (ornamental) gardens in Texas.  From that crop of corn in Texas, we harvested enough ears for one large, delicious pot of corn cut from the cob.

In this single/one-time attempt to grow corn in our North Carolina gardens, the seeds in the first planting germinated and were immediately pulled up and eaten by the squirrels that love to visit us.  So back to Secrest Feed & Seed we journeyed, on the square in downtown Monroe, for more corn seed.  Carl has a good imagination and devised a squirrel-proof seed starter device, using our garden cart, good soil, metal wire mesh, and assorted bricks.  He was diligent to water the soil and watch closely for any problems with this method.  The squirrels could NOT get to the seedlings and the seeds did germinate and begin to grow into tiny cornstalks

Squirrel-proof way to germinate corn seedlings

Seed incubator, also known as our garden cart

Squirrel-proof way to germinate corn seedlings

Squirrell-proof cover is sturdy and safe for emerging seedlings

Seeds are in the dirt, but haven't yet germinated

Seeds are in the soil, but haven’t yet germinated

Meanwhile, we also planted a few salad greens and a yellow squash vine.

Salad garden

Salad garden had just been planted

There was also lettuce & onions

A later look at the salad greens growing, and onion greenery beginning to stand

Salad garden 5 2004

We did harvest some good salad greens, and onions, from this bed, which is now the location of The Eva Perone Bed, mentioned in earlier posts

Squash in bloom, but did not become very productive

Several small, one-meal pots of squash were harvested from this little vine

Now, back to the cornfield that was being created.  The cornfield soil was tilled deeply, and smoothed, and terraced with curved rows.

6 1 08

Tilling the soil with the marvelous Mantis tiller

Why is he using the ladle - it should be in the kitchen

Why is my kitchen ladle on the ground by the cart? How could he possibly be using my LADLE? Maybe he used it to scoop the corn seedlings from the soil in the cart.

More smoothing of the cornfield - must be perfect

Smoothing cornfield with the dirt rake

Smoothing the cornfield with the dirt rake

More smoothing of the cornfield

Smoothed ground is looking good

And more smoothing of the cornfield. It must be perfect before he finishes.

On the way to the patio for a cool drink and a much deserved break

On the way to the patio for a cool drink and a much deserved break

Rows curved and lightly terraced, to decrease possibility of washout on this hillside

Lovely rows, curved and lightly terraced, decreased the possibility of washout on this hillside

The time had arrived to plant the seedlings, which Carl harvested from the squirrel-proof incubator.  Onto what?  A cookie sheet, of course.

Seedlings are waiting

One of many ways to use the cook’s kitchen items

Yes, time to dig small, individual holes into which the small, individual seedlings would be transplanted.

Only men use power tools to plant individual corn seedlings

Only men use power tools to transplant individual corn seedlings

Moments later, the orange attachment flew loose from the drill, after which June hand-panted the individual seedlings

Moments later, the orange attachment flew loose from the drill, flying all the way out of the cornfield and across the yard, after which I hand-planted the individual seedlings for Farmer Carl

Those hearty little seedlings increased in size.

Well, those are some fine little corn stalks

Well, these are some fine little corn stalks!

Here you see the last photo documentation of this lovely cornfield, because shortly after these pictures were taken, the cornstalks just sort of fell over and turned brown.

This shows the maximum growth of the corn. Even though we didn't have a harvest, it was a fun experience.

This shows the maximum growth, and height, of the corn

A mighty fine stand of corn

Even though we had no harvest from this field of corn, the process certainly was a lot of fun!

Carl is from Old East Dallas – a city boy for sure.  He is a man of many talents, but growing cornfields is an additional talent he no longer dreams of pursuing.

 

Check out Secrest Feed & Seed on Facebook at Secrest Feed & Seed

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2 comments on “North Carolina CORN!

  1. Clara
    July 23, 2015

    I see that teacher and that artist. Experimenting with Tarheel soil being a Texan relocated. I always thought the corn never got out of the wheel barrow. LOL!

    Like

  2. Clara
    July 23, 2015

    Innovation gardening trials. 🙂

    Like

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This entry was posted on July 20, 2015 by in My Woodland Garden and tagged , , .
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Woodland shade gardening with a purpose - pleasure, creativity, rainwater collection!

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