Woodland Shade Gardening

Woodland shade gardening with a purpose – pleasure, creativity, rainwater collection!

Lonicera removal update

  After removing this giant, invasive Lonicera shrub last summer, my concern was that there would be many baby Lonicera shoots that would keep coming up in this bed.  Not a single shoot has appeared from any tiny roots left in the ground by mistake.  This may begin to happen when the heat of summer arrives, but I will be vigilant and pull them out immediately if I see any.
  The Lonicera is also known by the common name ‘First Breath of Spring’, and its blossoms do have a wonderful fragrance.  It’s tiny white blossoms can freeze in January and February, thaw, and still be as fresh and fragile as before the freeze.  But trying to keep this shrub pruned back is an ongoing job, so it just had to go.  It seems once the roots are nicked, another group of trunks spring up from that nick.  So its growth becomes like a thicket, which was not good for this location.
  I still have a young Lonicera in the East Border, near the corner of the North Border, and will let it grow to full size there.  I plan to be extremely careful to never dig near it, or nick the roots, and hope it will mature as a single, lovely shrub, scenting the air each winter.  This is one of the few projects for which I needed Carl’s help.  I just couldn’t get the shovel to begin to break up the ground, but once we broke through the surface and began to pry the roots out of the ground, the soil began to loosen and the work was easier.  Sort of.

Lonicera - very dense, even though it seems like a twiggy shrub.

Lonicera – very dense, even though it seems like a twiggy shrub.

Lonicera - pruned back hard on the back side so we could continue walking between it and the house.

Lonicera – pruned back hard on the back side so we could continue walking between it and the house.

Time to dig out the trunks and roots.

Time to dig out the trunks and roots.

Using the Mantis to break up the ground and pull the small roots out by hand.

Using the Mantis to break up the ground and pull the small roots out by hand.

Very well stacked, so it won't blow away in the wind, waiting for the trash pickup.

Very well stacked, so it won’t blow away in the wind, waiting for the trash pickup.

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This entry was posted on April 19, 2015 by in Uncategorized.
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Woodland shade gardening with a purpose - pleasure, creativity, rainwater collection!

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